Connecticut suprassed a milestone with 45,000 residents testing positive for COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, while Massachusetts officials reported a total of 208 new cases and an additional 48 deaths.

A look at coronavirus-related developments around New England on Sunday:

Connecticut

Gov. Ned Lamont reported 94 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday, for a statewide total of 45,088 confirmed or probable infections.

The number of deaths due to the virus in Connecticut rose by 15, to 4,201. Hospitalizations declined by 28 patients to 205.

Massachusetts

The state Department of Public Health on Sunday reported 208 new cases of COVID-19 and an additional 48 deaths. That brings the total number of cases in the state to 105,603 and the death toll to 7,624.

The department reported progress on the rate of positive tests and the number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

The state’s seven-day average for positive tests has dropped by 90% since April 15, the department reported, while the three-day average of hospitalized patients fell 70% in the same period.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness and lead to death.

Maine

State health officials on Sunday reported no new COVID-19 deaths for the fifth straight day.

Maine’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention said the state’s death toll remained at 100, while the number of new cases increased by 36. That brings the total number of cases in the state to 2,793.

Of those with confirmed cases, 29 are hospitalized and 10 are in critical care.

Vermont

New cases of COVID-19 have increased by two, state health officials said Sunday, while no new deaths have been reported.

Data released by the Vermont Department of Health show that the state’s total number of cases increased to 1,127, while the number of deaths remained at 55. The state has reported no deaths since May 24.

Two people in the state are currently hospitalized with the disease.

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