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E-Reader Help 10 a.m. - Noon Charlestown

Storytime: 3-5 Year Olds 10 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. Westerly

RI Blood Drive 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Ashaway

Drop-in Knitting Group 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Charlestown

Book Discussion Group 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. Charlestown

Lego Club (Grades K and up) 4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. Westerly

Pilates and Strength 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Charlestown

Gadget Night 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. Westerly

Introduction to PARCC: The Next Generation Assessment 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Westerly

Irish Language Lessons 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Westerly

... Click for all of today's events


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Some gov’t programs work the way they’re supposed to

This editorial recently appeared in the Worcester (Mass.) Telegram & Gazette.

An Atlas V rocket lifted NASA’s Maven spacecraft into the heavens Monday, Nov. 18, the start of a mission that should offer the closest look ever at the Red Planet’s atmosphere, and perhaps furnish clues as to how global climate systems change over eons.

We couldn’t help but note the price tag for this mission: $671 million. That’s about the same price that was initially placed on the healthcare.gov website set up to help Americans sign up for insurance under Obamacare.

The Maven mission is still in its early stages, as well, but is off to a flying start, unlike the Obamacare website, whose problems have been widely documented.

We’re no fans of Obamacare, but we do hope the website gets fixed so that the program can proceed and Americans can find out whether it will succeed or fail on grounds other than technological glitches.

As for the latest mission to Mars, we’re delighted to see that some government programs do work as designed, and that Americans of all political persuasions now have another high-tech science project to keep their eyes on.



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