Data interchange business moving into new headquarters in Hopkinton

Data interchange business moving into new headquarters in Hopkinton

Record-Journal


HOPKINTON — After years of working in offices scattered throughout the area, employees of B2B Gateway.Net will move into the company’s new headquarters next week.

The Daedalus Center, named for the figure in Greek mythology and designed by Westerly architect John Walsh, is situated on a 9-acre parcel near Palmer Circle and is visible from Interstate 95.

Owned by Hopkinton residents Kevin and Donna Gilman Hoyle, B2B Gateway.Net specializes in electronic data interchange — business-document transfers for companies selling goods electronically to other companies. The company also has offices in Ireland, China and Australia.

Donna Hoyle, the company’s human resources director, said she was looking forward to having all 68 of the company’s Rhode Island employees in a single facility.

“It really gives the company a classy, professional appearance,” she said.

The Hoyles received town approval for the project in April 2015 and began construction almost immediately. After some initial trepidation, Kevin Hoyle, who said he has a distaste for going into debt, said he was feeling more relaxed about his company’s new endeavor.

“Who doesn’t get freaked out over debt?” he said. “This project is a pretty large-scale project, and obviously, we had to go to the bank for it, and I’m just not comfortable with that,” he said. “It’s still scary, maintaining everything, keeping it going, paying the note, but it is what it is and we’ll get through it.”

Donna agreed that the project had required a major leap of faith.

“You have to be fearless,” she said. “Neither one of us knew anything about commercial construction, but we knew we wanted our employees to have a nice place to work.”

The three-story building has a total of 23,000 square feet — two 10,000-square-foot sections connected by an atrium that will house the computer room. The building came in over budget, the result of a decision to finish additional office space to accommodate the company’s growing workforce.

“We said ‘You know what? We really need that space,’ so that was probably the biggest cost overrun, having those sections roughly fitted out so that the whole building is pretty much all carpeted, all walls, electrical and air conditioning now. So the whole building is done,” Kevin said.

The Hoyles incorporated the latest energy-saving technology in the new building.

“We built it with the most efficient pump systems in place,” Kevin said. “The whole building right now runs on electricity. Every single bit of the lighting is LED and we intend to install solar panels to power the whole building, so it will be virtually off the grid when we finish it up. We’re still bound by our internet connections. We have four or five Internet connections coming into the building right now. If our Internet connection goes down, that’s not a good thing. We need redundancy.”

The building will generate considerably more property tax revenue for the town, which was collecting $3,861 on the vacant land. Taxes on the Daedalus Center are $24,637.

Hopkinton Town Council President Frank Landolfi said he was pleased that the Hoyles had decided to build their corporate headquarters in the town where they live.

“It’s the type of business that we want,” he said. “It’s clean, not a lot of traffic, not a big carbon footprint. It’s a great business, and kudos to Kevin and Donna ... I’m really glad they decided to stay here. They could have gone anywhere, and to stay here, that really met a lot to me personally.”

The Hoyles have not ruled out expanding the office park if they fill the existing space.

“There’s open space in the building,” Kevin said. “Each section has three or four open cubicles and then the two wings that we decided to build out are going to be a training room and some more recreation space, stuff like that.

“Once that’s full and we start talking about ‘Hey maybe we should put in cubicles in the recreation space,’ then we’re going to have to start talking about building new buildings. We’ll see what the future holds.”

cdrummond@thewesterlysun.com

@cynthiadrummon4


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