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  • Read for the Record Storytime! 10 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. Westerly
  • Music and Story Hour 10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Charlestown
  • All-Members Exhibit AT ACGOW 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Westerly
  • Drop-in Knitting Group 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Charlestown
  • Basic Computer Class 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. Charlestown
  • Apple Gadget Group 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. Charlestown
  • Charlestown Writers' Workshop 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Charlestown
  • Richmond Republican Town Committee meeting 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Wyoming
  • Knit-a-long circle 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Carolina
  • "South Pacific" 8 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Westerly

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  • Scientist wins Borlaug prize for crop work

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A crop scientist credited with developing hundreds of varieties of disease-resistant wheat adaptable to many climates and difficult growing conditions has been named as the 2014 recipient of the World Food Prize.

    Sanjaya Rajaram, 71, won the $250,000 prize, founded by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Norman Borlaug, that honors vital contributions to improving the quality, quantity or availability of food throughout the world.

    Rajaram, who was born in India and is a citizen of Mexico, began research and field work with Borlaug in 1969. He successfully crossed varieties of winter and spring wheat with his own plant breeding techniques, which led to the development of plants that have higher yields and dependability under a wide range of environments — important in keeping pace with the growing world population.

    He is credited with developing 480 wheat varieties that have been released in 51 countries on six continents.

    The next big challenge, Rajaram said, is developing plants with more drought tolerance, staving off the effects of salt water intrusion as oceans rise, and other issues related to climate change.

    “Future crop production is bound to decline unless we fully factor in the issues related to climate change, soil fertility and water deficits, and utilize advanced genetics in the next 20 to 30 years,” he said.

    Rajaram was born in a small village in the Uttar Pradesh state in northeast India, where people lived on very little. He expanded upon his mentor Borlaug’s work with his own achievements, said World Food Prize Foundation President Kenneth Quinn.

    Quinn said it’s fitting that the prize be awarded to Rajaram as the Des Moines-based organization celebrates the centennial of Borlaug’s 1914 birth in Cresco, Iowa. Borlaug, who won the 1970 Nobel for boosting agricultural production in what has become known as the Green Revolution, launched the World Food Prize in 1986. He died in 2009.



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